I found these applications in Japan and totally fell in love with them. No idea what they mean so if you speak Japanese and it means something offensive: I'm very sorry..

 

To make them really stand out I decided to put them on an all grey outfit. It was a real struggle to find matching grey fabrics because I couldn't use the same fabric for the sweater and the pants. 

For the sketch I'm using copic markers on markerpaper. I always have my fabric and things near me because that often inspires me.

The pattern for the sweater is quite basic. The fabric is made of a thick neoprene. For the cuffs I used a red cotton.

The fabric of the pants is a thin wool fabric. I wasn't planning on using wool but it was the only fabric I could find in this colour.  The pants will have a zipper in the front. For the back I will be making a jetted pocket.

I used a basic trousers block for this pattern. I made the leg about 5cm above the ankle. I lowered the waistline 5 cm because otherwise it would be a high-waisted pants. And I didn't want that.. I added the zipper fly, a waistband and a jetted pocket, which I will explain below. I also added a little bit of space in the center of the front, because I want a seam there.

  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image

I added space in the pattern by folding a little line in the paper. This is the easy way of doing this. Ofcourse you could also move the block a bit while drawing the pattern but the result is the same. After tracing the block just open the fold and you've got yourself a seam.

  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image

 

In this illustration I try to make clear how you can sew in a jetted pocket. There are actually more ways to do this but I've chosen this way because I find this the easiest. Below you can also see some pictures of the process.

rs = right side (white)
ws = wrong side (grey)

The haberdashery didn't had a grey zipper so I used a beige one.. In the post with the mixed prints I explain how to put in a zipper.

To give the waistband a little more strength I put in some vlieseline. By pressing it with the iron it will stick on the fabric. I overstitched the waistband to give it a nice finishing.

For the finishing I added a little piece of metal to the point of the waistband. I do this by hammering the edges so it's stuck on the fabric. By the way, this has no other function than to shine ;)

Because I don't want a button, I'm using little hooks for the closure.

Because I don't want a seamline in the hemlines I use glue which will get sticky when you iron it.

  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image

I'm using a t-shirt block for this design. To make the neckline I first measured the length with a flexible measuring tape (that blue thing). 

It's better to first add stuff to fabric before sewing the pattern pieces together. This is also the case for pockets. So, here I'm pinning the applications in place and then sewing the edges. The applications are ironable but it's allways a good idea to sew them on because you don't want to lose them..

Because I'm using the same fabric for the neckline, which is not very flexible, I sew in a little triangle in the side seams of the neckline. In this way there will be a little corner there which results in a better fitting neckline (it won't stand out too much).

Keep those little notches in mind when sewing in the arm!

  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image

To make the cuff I first measure my wrist. I don't have to keep in mind that my hand needs to get through because the fabric I'm using for the cuff is very flexible and I want it to really fit my wrist tight (don't want it hanging in my coffee). To make sure the fabrics get nicely and even together I first sew in a loose thread (upper thread on lowest position) without backstitching. Now I can pull this thread on both sides which will wrinkle the fabric. Then I pin and sew the cuff onto it. Make sure to remove the loose thread in the end.

  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image