I love mixing pieces in an outfit that don’t fit together in an obvious way, in this case a sporty sweater with a girly skirt.

 

Here you see some croquis I've made. I'm using a croquis because I don't want to put too much time and effort into making the proportions of the body. Instead I want to focus on the designing part only.

Today I'm using the one in the middle. This way I can show the arms of the design best.

 

  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image

Ofcourse I would prefer sketching a design and then go to the fabric store and buy the exact fabric I had in mind. But I had to change that way of working because here in Holland there are not that many fabric shops so the choices in fabrics are very limited. So, my working strategy nowadays is different: First I go to the fabric shop and look around for cool fabrics and then I will start sketching the outfit.. It's a limitation but otherwise you will always be totally disappointed that you can't find the fabrics you need.

For this sketch I'm using pencil (H2), fineliners and copic markers on marker paper. This paper is slightly thinner than normal paper so you can see the croquis through it.

 

To give the sweater a sporty feeling I decided to put in raglan sleeves, a V-neck line and snug cuffs and waist.

Raglan sleeves are quite different than normal sleeves, because the sleeves end in the neckline. This makes the shoulders less defined than with normal sleeves. It's all a matter of taste!

For the skirt I decided to lower the waistline 5 centimeters. If you wear it with a cropped top, you would now see your belly button. The length of the skirt is below the knee and it has a view inches flair, just so you could walk easily.

For the sweater I'm using 3 different fabrics. Number 1 is a knitted polyester with the pattern squeezed in. Number 2 is a fake leather which is also synthetic. The fabric for the cuffs and the neckline (number 3), is a mixed cotton with elastan.

For the skirt I am using a thin printed woven cotton (number 4), and for the lining a light weighted satin (number 5).

First you have to decide what you want the styleline between the sleeve and the body to look like. As you can see on the left picture, I gave it a rounded shape, but you could also choose to make it in a straight line or with an angle. I'm tracing it with a tracing wheel to show the line on the paper underneath.

To make raglan sleeves I have to bring the upper part of the bodies block to the top of the sleeves (the red  part). Now the sleeve ending is in the neckline.

I'm drawing in the lines for the green stripe. I want the line to be on the exact front of the shirt, so that's why I draw the line just a view centimeters (about an inch) from the middle between the front and the back.

This is a sketch of how the patterns will look like in the end. There are still some things to do, the neckline is not shapen in a V and the front pattern is way too short, but you get an idea of how it's going to look like.  Now I have to seperate them all and have to put in the seam allowance to every pattern part. I decided to first make the sweater with unbleached cotton because I wasn't totally sure where the green line is placed on the sweater. I just made one sleeve because I don't want too much waste.

On the left you can see the finished pattern parts of the sleeve including the seam allowance (1.5 cm).

I'm totally happy with the result of the pattern. At this part I always get overexcited about continuing. The problem with this phenomenon is that this gives you the highest risk of making stupid mistakes.

Because the cuffs are less wide than the arm is, I first stitch the ending of the sleeve with the upper thread extremely loose. When I've gone around I don't backstitch, but only cut the thread. Now you can pull the thread and it will softly wrinkle the fabric. Then I placed the cuff on top and sewn them together.

06_rok-knippen-stof_2000x87706_rok-knippen-stof_2000x877

With thin fabrics I prefer using a pair of scissors over a cutting wheel. It gives me more feeling of control.

The pattern of the interlining and the front are exactly the same. Here I am sewing them together. To prevent the interlining from popping out, I've rolled the fabric a millimeter down before sewing. You can see that also in the picture below.

Sewing a zipper in a skirt is a lot more easy than in pants (the post with the mixed prints). You just sew it first in one side, connect the pattern parts, and then sew it in the other side. The one difficult part when you use interlining is that you have to make sure that the interlining is placed correct.

Not too bad!

  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image
  • gallery-image