I love painting with watercolours. It is easy to learn and you can make little changes while working so it's not totally ruined if you did something stupid (unless you did something really stupid). You can see through the paint, so if your pencil drawing is looking ok, you're almost sure it's going to give a nice result.

To get the right colours I use a pocket colour wheel, which helps to mix the colours.

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I've learned pattern cutting in a three week course in London. It's too hard to explain everything to you now but I hope if you see it all, you might get an idea of all the steps it takes to make them. There are a lot of books that give you a step by step approach in learning pattern cutting, but if you really want to learn this I recommend a course. The benefit of a course is that you can ask questions and see it in real time.

So basically, I've first traced the standard bodies block and the standard pants block, matched them together (but did some pivoting to get the right shape), made changes on the pattern to get the right pattern parts et voila, you got yourself some dungarees!

Below you can see a summery of all the pattern parts of the dungarees. The black lines represent the standard bodies blocks.

 

 

My dungarees contain 12 pattern parts. 6; 10; 11 & 12 are pockets. Some of the parts have to be folded, because there is no seam in the middle (2; 4; 8; 9 & 10). If you're going to cut the fabric, you can lay these pieces on the foldline of the fabric (in the project with the blue dress you can see more about this). Because the shoulder straps overlap the front and back, the pattern parts (5) should be connected if you're cutting the fabric.

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Before sewing I've pressed the pocket in shape with a iron. It's always a good preparation to start with pressing because it gives you way more control.

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To prevent the back pocket from stretching I've ironed in some vlieseline to the fly of the pocket. For the finishing I drew a 90's graphic and sewn over it to give it some detail. The pockets always have to be attached before you sew your pants together! Don't forget!

The buttons should be firmly attached, so I put some vlieseline behind them. To fold the fabric you have to cut in the corners, so it won't bulk or stretch too much.

Here you see the back of the dungarees (part 3 & 4). First connect those parts, then connect them to part 2.

Because the fabric I had wasn't long enough, I had to cut it in two and sew it together. I cut it twice, so the front and back are both looking the same.

I've put some thin stickable vlieseline in the edges, to make it more stiff. This isn't really necessary. Then I folded the edges over it, so you won't see the vlieseline.

I always find it hard to find the best looking spot for the back pockets. I try to look at it in a mirror or on a mannequin.

Loose your agression but don't hit your finger.

I want a round cut out on the shoulder. So, I connected the three parts where the fabric meets on the top of the shoulder and drew a circle with a pair of compasses. Then I drew in the seam allowance (1 cm) and cut it out.

If you want to sew straight it helps to make some notches. Try to draw the notches on a different place on the back and the front but with an exact measurement (for example: front, 5 & 6 cm from the shoulder line, back 3 & 8 cm from shoulder line). When you're sewing and you suddenly find an odd placed notch, you know you have your fabric placed wrong.

Lady gaga is always keeping an eye on my work;)

Because I'm using an interlining in a different colour than the fabric on the front, I don't want the interlining to stick out. I avoid this by pinning the fabric of the interlining a millimeter below the front fabric.

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