While I was planning my trip to Japan, I got really inspired to make a kimono style jacket! Combined with some really western style jeans it makes a perfect travelling outfit!

This outfit contains three pieces: the coat, a jeans and a top. The jeans will be high waisted with a basic loose fit. The shirt is made of a fabric which contains cotton and eleastin and will be open in the back. The coat is made of woven wool.

Making a kimono is actually quite easy. Just add some space to the side seam of the bodice block and connect the arm to that point. If you want to be more precise, buy the book: Pattern Cutting for Women's Tailored Jackets: Classic and Contemporary. Written by Winifred Aldrich.

Only five seams to sew!

Because I want to make interlining in the coat, I drew a pattern for that as well. This might look more complicated, but it's just tracing the pieces on the actual pattern.

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Here are some pictures of the sewing process. I've made a small pocket on the inner side of the coat so I can put my phone there.

 

I just love making jeans! It's always so nice to make something of which you know you would want to wear it every day. You can wear it in summer, because the cotton fabric won't get too sweaty and you can wear it in winter because it's suprisingly warm! And, also really important: you can wear it on a bicycle! I just love jeans!

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I want to make loose fitting jeans so I have to give the pattern some extra space to make sure it will fit perfect. I've put some extra space in the back, just a view centimeters above the hipline. This extra space also gives extra room to make movements with your hip, so especially riding a bike will be no problem!

First i've sewn the yoke and the back together and overstitched twice with a view millimeters in between to give that typical jeans style seam. Also it's easy to sew the pocket in at this point of the process. Otherwise it might become a struggle to get the pocket on the right place. With chalk I drew a little design detail on the pocket and overstitched it.

What is a jeans without a little money pocket? I made the inner side of the pocket out of mouseline, just because that is less thick so it won't bulk. As you can see I made a mistake by cutting the innerpocket the exact same as the pattern so I had to cut a bit off. 

The zipper is a bit too long so I had to shorten it. Just cut off a view of those metal pieces and place the top one (the wider one) again on it so your zipper won't run off it. If that bigger one got broken, in most haberdashery you can buy those little bastards. If you want to see how to put in a zipper step by step, you can watch this post. 

In this jeans I'm using a straigth waistband. This is different than in the trousers in this post with the culottes. The fit of a straigth waistband is a little bit off, but in case of a loose fitting jeans that won't matter at all. I've ironed some vlieseline into the waistband to give it a bit more strength. Because I don't want it to be too stiff, I only put it on one side.

Last but not least: finished it with some loops!

 

 

To give the top some more interesting design I decided I want to open the back a bit and show some skin.. I also like this idea because the fabric I'm using has stripes on it and in this way I can play around with those, just like I did in my first post on this website!

Normally I would use flat patterncutting for making a top like this, just because that gives me the feeling of more control, but this time I decided to drape. First I made some stylelines on my mannequin with fashiontape. Then with some mouseline I draped the pattern.

 

I only draped one side because you can predict how this will fit in the end. After draping it, I traced the stylelines with a soft pencil so the pattern will still be shown after you take it of the mannequin. The other side of the back will be the exact same pattern, only vertical mirrored.

 

After tracing the pattern, like I've shown in this post, this is the final pattern of the top. I have to cut the back twice and the front once, on the fold line. The grain, which is the line with the arrows, is different for the back and the front. On the back, I want the lines to be diagonal to match the lines of the fabric. This means I can't just fold the fabric and cut two pieces in once, because then the lines won't be mirrored on the both sides.

I finished the seams easy by just rolling the ends around. You can only do this with fabrics that are not stiff.

To make sure the top will not open to far on the back, I decided to put some stickable glue between the two layers on the back. It might be hard to see but it's the white lint I have in my left hand. Just place it on the spot and iron it and it will stick.

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